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What are you drinking?

There isn’t an emoji for covering my face while giggling watching you try something weird.

But, I’d be the next.

To answer your question The suggested method is to put the open can in a pot of water and then simmer the water. If you are being fancy you can do it the “proper” way and pour it into a little server which you then hook onto the rim of a large pot of simmering water, such that the server does not touch the bottom of your pot.
Methods may vary depending on who you ask and there is really no right way to do it. I have used your “exhaust manifold” method before myself to great affect.

Kikusui recommends that you drink it chilled. So that’s what we did.
Sake seems to me to be a lot like Italian wine. The best stuff never really leaves the city it’s made in while the plonk is exported cheaply.

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I was shocked that it worked so well when we tried it!

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When I was a younger man in the state of Arizona i used to warm tamales using the same method. I’d buy them from an older lady who would come round the convenience store near the lab in the afternoon. They were wrapped in foil so I’d pile them in the engine compartment before heading home for the night. They were piping hot by the time I’d get home. Add a beer and I had dinner for under 5 USD.

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Hahahaha! That’s awesome! :+1:

We actually sold a cookbook at the remainder bookshop I used to work at that was filled with recipes you could cook under your hood, complete with where-to-put-what, and approximate mileage until it would be done! I wish I still had a copy.


Sorry for diverging, everyone, let’s get back to the liquids.

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Whoops, found it!

Sorry again, I just had to post this. These are actually doable, real recipes that work, and it’s funny as hell. Somehow we got a late 90s copy before the “original” 2008 printing, but these guys had been doing this since the late 80s, apparently.

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Tonight is one of the new wave liquors. Japanese craft gin. Apparently, this is “the thing” according to various blogs. I have only encountered it in the home city of the various distilleries or in very special liquor shops that focus on variety.
That is to say, mosy regular people in my part of Japan have no idea that craft gin exists, much less Japanese craft gin.

My partner had bought me several bottles for Xmas. Now that it is summer it is the perfect time to dive in to them. So let’s start with 和美人, or “Wa bi gin” as the lable says.

The name, like all good booze names, is a pun.
和美人(wabijin) literally means “beautiful Japanese (lady)” but the company is using the ambiguity inherent in romanization to add an extra meaning. “Wa bi gin” can thus be read to mean “beautiful Japanese gin.”

And it is. If you are looking for a craft gin that gives you a slight hint of Japan, then this it. It has a fairly regular Bombay Sapphire flavor profile with just a hint of green tea, yuzu, and ginger. Subtle and delicious, but not exactly worth the price of entry. At close to ¥4000 yen, more than Tanqueray 10, I can’t really recommend it as a regular drink. It’s fine for a one off, but not really worth the premium when compared to mass produced gin. Unless you are the "extra cold dry gin martini-open the vermouth and waft it over the glass, no olive " gin drinker then you may want to give 和美人 a pass. There are much better value for money Japanese gins to try first. But, if money is no object, then go ahead and partake.

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Neat. I was previously unaware that Japan had its own gin distilleries. I will have to take a pass though (I’m one of those people who has tried lots of different gin, but thinks they all taste like Pine-Sol :wink: ). That just means more for the rest of you! :cocktail::woozy_face:

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Last weekend, my flatmate was helping out at a bar for an event at our university. He didn’t got any money but 2kg (!) of limes, 2 bottles of Tequila, 2 bottles of good ol Johnny Walker, some gin, vodka and even a set of cocktail shakers.

So what this means is were having sours every day for nearly a week now. And there are still 1kg of limes left :laughing:

If I am not having sours, my drink of choice would be a Talisker btw - just to add some class to my post…

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The New Zealand gin scene seems to have exploded recently too. Really really tasty stuff coming out.

Sounds like a deal to me! That’s like $40-$60 worth of limes here. Which is why bars used ‘bottled lime juice’ in cocktails and they’re bad.

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I’m primarily drinking Jude from Reformation Brewery. It’s local to the Atlanta Area. It’s a Belgian, and I think it’s relatively smooth, tastes like I’m drinking a loaf of bread, with just a hint of pink bubblegum. I love it.

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Mostly homemade wine. It’s… serviceable!

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I’m not normally a gin drinker but we’ve got to use up the rest of the bitter lemon so… Oak aged Gin 22

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Japan makes fine whiskey, now, why not gin? It only took the West hundreds of years to master, but Japanese whiskey is OK, they got something in a few decades. (I still don’t think they have a handle on beer, yet, tbh).

I get the juniper (oh, did I just drink a WHOLE PINE?) thing, but I’d like to see how Japan either messes it up (like pizza) or makes it good (like whiskey).

Next step: Japan taking on Tequila!

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Spent most of this afternoon (and evening) drinking Kraken rum with ginger Pepsi Max and limes. :+1:

:astonished:
You lost me at Pepsi Max.

More for me then!

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I’m not one to drink rum, but when I do it’s definitely a Kraken time. (I’m sorry)

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When we were in Japan just this past month I saw some hints of a craft brewery renaissance in various stores and bars. It reminded me a lot of when I first moved to Los Angeles and you really had to hunt down anything in the craft/micro category. I have a feeling that in 3-5 years craft beer is going to be HUGE there, and because of characteristic Japanese attention to detail and innovation, Japanese craft beer will kick major ass all over the world. Looking forward to it! On a side note, Roku botanical gin is fairly readily available in the US (from $27-$35/bottle) and if you like a flowery botanical gin (I do) it’s definitely worth checking out.

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