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Beef Chat - Because we were chatting about beef in other, more seasoned threads


#1

Continued conversation from Ask a Chef!


#2

Most ribs done over here are pork :wink:

Reason being is that most of the meat that is supposed to be found between beef back ribs ends up on the bottom of the Rib-eye when they bone out the Rib… Unless you use Short ribs from the Plate or Chuck… I will have to get my “British Primals” chart out since you lot call everything different… We could go with Science names… But I do not want to put in that much effort…



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Ask a Chef!
#3

Fun fact: Right now the most expensive cut of pork in the USA is Back Ribs, followed by Pork Belly. Back ribs are soo much right now they do not mind leaving extra meat on them from the Pork Loin to bump up weights and yields… Pork Belly is second because of Bacon. So much so they try to get all the meat they can off of the spare ribs when pulling the belly meat…


#4

We cut some of the cuts differently as well, I seem to remember - you guys apparently don’t get Cote de Boeuf (My absolute favourite steak)


#5

Ahhh, that is just the Bone-in version of the Rib-eye. Also just called a “Rib Steak”, “Bone-in Rib”, “Bone-In Rib-eye{incorrect}”, “Standing Rib Roast Steak”, … The common names just go on and on.

You are lucky I took French in secondary school (high school)! I can read it, but not speak it!

Mine as well!


#6

Pork belly’s my “I’m impoverished and it’s the only meat I can afford” meat - but I just looked and it’s doubled in price - I mean £4/Kg is still dirt cheap (for the UK), but it used to be £2!!!


#7

Bacon, Sir, Bacon…

I remember when we could not give away Back Ribs… Then Chili’s came along… But at least Bnls Loins are cheap!


#8

That might not be it the - I managed farms for the National trust, including a herd of Dexter who lived on the cliffs while I was working as their photographer (no-one gets away with working for the NT without doing a bunch of voluntary work as well) and we had an American come to buy a certain cut and our abattoir said that it wasn’t economically feasible because they cut the meat the other way for something different.


#9

Its the only steak you can get properly rare, medium and well done all in the same steak, and I like each as their own thing (heresy I know, but I just do!)


#10

From my understanding, it is from how the beef is broken down from quarters, to primals, to sub-primals, to retail finished cuts…

I did some looking, and are these what you were talking about?


https://www.waitrose.com/ecom/products/waitrose-1-cote-de-boeuf/439242-497654-497655
https://www.fieldandflower.co.uk/butchers/beef/cote-de-boeuf-750g


This is very common. Some wonky regional USA cuts are Tri-tips, Flat Iron Steaks, Denver Cut Steaks, Bottom Sirloin, “Las Vegas” Strip Steak… These are all cuts that are part of a larger primal which can be sold more efficiently in a different form.

Some cuts that always make me laugh: Hanger Steak, Skirt Steak, Mock Tenderloin.


#11

Hehe I buy skirt a lot - it’s the best cut for Cornish pasty’s, my speciality!

That Cote looks tiny and is twice the price of what I would pay… Eversfield… yup, that makes sense! The waitrose one is like a skinny version! The field and flower one is about there!


#12

This is where language becomes the problem :slight_smile: I believe what you call a Skirt Steak in the UK is what we call a “Flank” Steak. I like this a lot just to grill rare outside. Slice up for fajitas!
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Over here a Skirt Steak is actually the diaphragm muscle…

It is a nice image… But I disagree with the “Avoid” Comment. If you know how to cook it right, Inside Skirt is just fine!

It is all about cutting the muscle grain perpendicular to the direction it runs…


Here is your USA version of Cote de Beouf :wink:
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http://shop.lafrieda.com/usda-prime-black-angus-tomahawk-steak.html

That is a lot of money for the extra long bone!


#13

Actually… It might be better to change the heading to “Talk about Beef” or “Talk about Meat”… There is a lot of beefy images…


#14

Possibly, we have flank steaks over here too - it might just be a more marketable term for the same cut!


#15

Don’t mind me, I’ll just be over here paying $20/Kg for pork belly (or roughly 10 pound/kg). Still buy it, cause bacon is tasty. And it’s not horrifically expensive for meat here. Occasionally you can get it cheaper here, but I’ve also been told it’s imported pork.

I’ve been learning through online articles that meat here is hilariously expensive. A friend of mine, while a student, refused to buy meat if it cost more that $10/kg. He ate a lot of chicken and mince and not much else.


#16

To be fair, here - pork belly is not cured, it’s not the same as bacon, which you can expect to pay £6/kg at the very cheapest!


#17

Ohh, I can tell I was tired when I wrote that. The missing context is:
I buy pork belly to home cure, cause commercial bacon is… Kinda bad? Just ok?

Now the funny thing is, $20 gets you 1 kg of pork belly. But it will also get you 1kg of bacon. So I’m guessing almost all our pork belly gets turned into bacon, and whatever doesn’t is sold at a similar price to what they can make from bacon.

Moral of the story, market forces are weird.


#18

(I have to admit, when I saw “Beef Chat,” I wasn’t sure if it was in “Cooking” or in “Thunderdome.”)


#19

Yep!


#20

I am disappointed that the title of this thread uses “focused” instead of “seasoned”.